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RELIGION > MY RELIGION SECTION ONE : WHAT I MEAN BY RELIGION > Definition of Religion

 

01. Definition of Religion

By religion, I do not mean formal religion or customary religion, but that religion which underlies all religions, which brings us face to face with our Maker.

M. K. Gandhi, By Joseph J. Doke, 1909, p. 7


Religion should pervade every one of our actions. Here religion does not mean sectarianism. It means a belief in ordered moral government of the universe. It is not less real because it is unseen. This religion transcends Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, etc. It does not supersede them. It harmonizes them and gives them reality.

Harijan, 10-2-'40 p. 445


Let me explain what I mean by religion. It is not the Hindu religion which I certainly prize above all other religions, but the religion which transcends Hinduism, which changes one's very nature, which binds one indissolubly to the truth within and whichever purifies. It is the permanent element in human nature which counts no cost too great in order to find full expression and which leaves the soul utterly restless until it has found itself, known its Maker and appreciated the true correspondence between the Maker and itself.

Young India, 12-5-'20, p. 2


No man can live without religion. There are some who in the egotism of their reason declare that they have no­thing to do with religion. But it is like a man saying that he breathes but that he has no nose. Whether by reason, or by instinct, or by superstition, man acknowledges some sort of relationship with the divine. The rankest agnostic or atheist does acknowledge the need of a moral principle, and associates something good with its observance and something bad with its non-observance. Bradlaugh, whose atheism is well-known, always insisted on proclaiming his innermost conviction. He had to suffer a lot for thus speak­ing the truth, but he delighted in it and said that truth is its own reward. Not that he was quite insensible to the joy resulting from the observance of truth. This joy however is not at all worldly, but springs out of communion with the divine. That is why I have said that even a man who dis­owns religion cannot and does not live without religion.

Young India, 23-1-'30, p. 25